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Department of Labor Proposes New Overtime Protections for 3.6M Salaried Workers

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has proposed a new rule that would restore and extend overtime protections to 3.6 million salaried workers.
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The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has proposed a new rule that would restore and extend overtime protections to 3.6 million salaried workers, guaranteeing overtime pay for most salaried workers earning less than $1,059 per week, or about $55,000 per year. The ultimate goal is to ensure that more workers receive extra pay protections if they work longer hours.

The DOL held 27 listening sessions with more than 2,000 employers, workers, unions and other stakeholders to inform the proposed rule, which is now subject to public commentary for 60 days. The department will consider all comments before publishing a final rule. The proposal will:

  • Restore and extend overtime protections to low-paid salaried workers. Many low-paid salaried employees work side-by-side with hourly employees, doing the same tasks and often working over 40 hours a week, according to the DOL. These low-paid salaried workers aren’t getting paid time-and-a-half for hours worked over 40 in a week. The department’s proposed salary level would help ensure that more of these low-paid salaried workers receive overtime protections traditionally provided by the department’s rules.
  • Give workers who are not exempt executive, administrative or professional employees valuable time back. By better identifying which employees are executive, administrative or professional employees who should be overtime exempt, the proposed rule will better ensure that those who are not exempt will gain more time with their families or receive additional compensation when working more than 40 hours a week.
  • Prevent a future erosion of overtime protections and ensure greater predictability. The rule proposes automatically updating the salary threshold every three years to reflect current earnings data.
  • Restore overtime protections for U.S. territories. From 2004 until 2019, regulations ensured that the overtime salary threshold was available in U.S. territories where the federal minimum wage was too.

“We are committed to ensuring that all workers are paid fairly for their hard work,” said Principal Deputy Wage and Hour Division Administrator Jessica Looman. “For too long, many low-paid salaried workers have been denied overtime pay, even though they often work long hours and perform much of the same work as their hourly counterparts. This proposed rule would ensure that more workers receive extra pay when they work long hours. Public input is essential as we consider the needs of today’s workforce and industry demands, and we encourage continued stakeholder input during the public comment period.”

Department of Labor Proposes New Overtime Protections for 3.6M Salaried Workers

by | Sep 5, 2023

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has proposed a new rule that would restore and extend overtime protections to 3.6 million salaried workers.
The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has proposed a new rule that would restore and extend overtime protections to 3.6 million salaried workers, guaranteeing overtime pay for most salaried workers earning less than $1,059 per week, or about $55,000 per year. The ultimate goal is to ensure that more workers receive extra pay protections if they work longer hours.

The DOL held 27 listening sessions with more than 2,000 employers, workers, unions and other stakeholders to inform the proposed rule, which is now subject to public commentary for 60 days. The department will consider all comments before publishing a final rule. The proposal will:

  • Restore and extend overtime protections to low-paid salaried workers. Many low-paid salaried employees work side-by-side with hourly employees, doing the same tasks and often working over 40 hours a week, according to the DOL. These low-paid salaried workers aren’t getting paid time-and-a-half for hours worked over 40 in a week. The department’s proposed salary level would help ensure that more of these low-paid salaried workers receive overtime protections traditionally provided by the department’s rules.
  • Give workers who are not exempt executive, administrative or professional employees valuable time back. By better identifying which employees are executive, administrative or professional employees who should be overtime exempt, the proposed rule will better ensure that those who are not exempt will gain more time with their families or receive additional compensation when working more than 40 hours a week.
  • Prevent a future erosion of overtime protections and ensure greater predictability. The rule proposes automatically updating the salary threshold every three years to reflect current earnings data.
  • Restore overtime protections for U.S. territories. From 2004 until 2019, regulations ensured that the overtime salary threshold was available in U.S. territories where the federal minimum wage was too.

“We are committed to ensuring that all workers are paid fairly for their hard work,” said Principal Deputy Wage and Hour Division Administrator Jessica Looman. “For too long, many low-paid salaried workers have been denied overtime pay, even though they often work long hours and perform much of the same work as their hourly counterparts. This proposed rule would ensure that more workers receive extra pay when they work long hours. Public input is essential as we consider the needs of today’s workforce and industry demands, and we encourage continued stakeholder input during the public comment period.”